By

Sandra Chaloux

| 03/11/2017

Ford Explorer Carbon Monoxide Alert

Ford Explorer Carbon Monoxide Alert

If you or a loved one drives a Ford Explorer and haven’t been feeling well, and don’t known why, read on…

My brother, Michael, recently discovered that he had carbon monoxide poisoning from driving his 2013 Ford Explorer. We want to share his story to help others who may also have had mysterious health issues and episodes.

Michael hasn’t felt well for the past 3.5 years. He drove a 2013 Ford Explorer. The first episode was about 3 years ago, when he was on his way to the airport for his annual golf trip. When he got to the airport and was about to board the plane, he felt dizzy and passed out. He never got on the plane. The paramedics were called in. He thought it was high blood pressure or that he was having a heart attack.

Michael went to his doctor and his doctor prescribed high blood pressure medication. A few weeks later, Michael picked up his son and while he was driving, he had to pull over and passed out behind the wheel. This was a frightening experience, but thankfully no one got hurt. At this point, we thought it was his blood pressure medication.

Over the past 3.5 years, Michael’s symptoms included: being dizzy (like vertigo), having shortness of breath, migraines, nausea, and he couldn’t exercise for longer than 10 minutes without having to sit down. This caused a great deal of anxiety not knowing what was causing him to have these debilitating symptoms –and he said many times he feared the worst.

In mid-February, a friend told Michael about a CBS news report that had just come out about the exhaust leak of carbon monoxide in Ford Explorers.

Michael then went to his doctor to check it out. He did a blood test that confirmed that he had long term carbon monoxide poisoning. He stopped driving his Ford Explore 2 weeks ago and he is feeling much better. His doctor told him that it takes 4 weeks to recover from carbon monoxide poisoning after you remove yourself from the source.

We discussed whether the exposure could have been from his home. Michael has moved several times in the past 3.5 years and lives in a brand new house. He told me that carbon monoxide poisoning comes from the combustion of an engine. He does not believe that his new house was the source. Thankfully, his wife and 2 children who drive other cars have not had the health symptoms that he has had.

Michael and his friends had a celebration dinner recently because they finally know what was causing him to feel ill. His health seems to be returning to normal. For the first time in years, Michael said he was able to complete a workout.

Ford Explorers models from 2011-2017 have this defect. It is very disappointing that Ford has known about this problem since 2012, hasn’t fixed the problem, and still continues to sell these vehicles.

There are millions of Ford Explorers on the road, so please pass this on to anyone you know who owns one.


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